It's been several years since we offered cold weather garments. In 2017, we attempted to transition our wool supply chain to be fully traceable and 100% domestic, with animal welfare standards and production methods in line with our values. We worked a little too quickly, and weren't able to pull it off. This year, we are incredibly proud to offer wool the right way. We started over with everything we learned, and the new material we've developed is traceable, domestic, and Climate Beneficial™.

This collection, CWC for short, is built for cooler weather. Ritual and comfort are at the forefront: garments that provide repose, strength, and confidence, but that also ask a bit of a question, leave a little to the imagination. Soft folds, dynamic textures, and the contrast of earthy fiber paired with elegant silhouettes. I'm thrilled to bring new energy to this collection now, and I'm grateful for your support and patience as we've worked on it behind the scenes. I hope you love it.

Warm, thick, and luxurious wools imbue a sense of safety and warmth. Familiar silhouettes are like old friends. Colors that are neutral and warm but near impossible to define; these give interest and spark to foundational clothing. Layers and jackets are barriers between your body and the whipping winds and chilled air, but also pieces of wearable art.

For the return of our Cold Weather Collection, we developed a custom wool-alpaca blend in two colors and two weights. Fawn and Charcoal are timeless, classic neutrals that are lightly heathered with flecks of ivory and other tonal variation in the yarn for a dynamic, earthy appearance that honors the organic nature of animal fiber.

The two weights we developed are just different enough to serve multiple functions, but both are incredibly warm and soft. The lightweight plainweave is perfect for pants and light sweaters. The heavyweight plainweave is still airy and light, but thick enough for coats and jackets.

 

Our Supply Chain


I was fortunate enough to be able to visit almost every point in the supply chain of our domestically sourced wool, and I want to pass along all the insight and knowledge I've gained along the way. I have so much more information to share with you, and most importantly, I want to try to answer some of the really hard questions regarding animal and land husbandry. I hope you'll follow along our wool adventure in the weeks to come. We'll be releasing the remaining content in parts, each with a different topic, and you can stay in-the-know by revisiting this page throughout this cold weather season.